Life Below Water

Goal 14 Life Below Water

Goal 14: Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources

The world’s oceans – their temperature, chemistry, currents and life – drive global systems that make the Earth habitable for humankind.

Our rainwater, drinking water, weather, climate, coastlines, much of our food, and even the oxygen in the air we breathe, are all ultimately provided and regulated by the sea. Throughout history, oceans and seas have been vital conduits for trade and transportation.

Careful management of this essential global resource is a key feature of a sustainable future.

Interested Scholars

The following scholars are interested in this topic:

My interests are in coastal disasters and mitigation, with an emphasis on methods to evaluate the risks of tropical cyclones and storm surge. I am currently working on developing an integrated social and physical vulnerability index for a better risk assessment and more targeted approach for planning and preparing a coastal community prior to a hurricane.

PhD Candidate Egypt Academic Discipline: Computer/Data Sciences, Economics, Political Science, Public Policy Interests Keywords: Big Data, Computational Models., Decision-Making, development, Disasters, Game Theory, political economy About me: Sustainable Development Goals: Affordable and Clean Energy, Clean Water and Sanitation, Climate Action, Decent Work and Economic Growth, Gender Equality, Good Health and Well-being, Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure, [...]

My research investigates the political economy of governance and environmental management in developing countries. One main strand of my research addresses the ways that foreign donors can support better environmental management in the countries where they work. My book Giving Aid Effectively examines when and why member states and civil society groups can make the multilateral development banks, which manage approximately half of all international development finance, responsive to their environmental performance. Other recent projects investigate when foreign aid catalyzes private sector investment in emerging technologies, when externally-financed institution building persists over time, and how remotely sensed data can be used as part of geospatial impact evaluation to improve the evidence behind environment and development interventions.

Another main strand of my research investigates experimentally the effects of transparency on governance and political accountability. I am currently leading or co-leading several field experiments that investigate when information about the programmatic performance of politicians changes vote choice, whether citizen-sourced data on public services improves the governance of urban public services, how transparency encourages citizens to seek accountability from governments, why national-level transparency rating programs affect the actions of local governments in authoritarian contexts. All of these field experiments are designed and implemented as part of strong partnerships with implementing agencies around the world.

I joined Essex Business School in November 2013. Previously I held posts at Queen’s University Belfast (2007-2013) and Middlesex University Business School (1996-2007). I have published over 100 peer reviewed journal articles, book chapters and conference papers in areas such as social entrepreneurship, hybrid businesses, green supply chain management, the role of business in development, sustainability discourse, and ecopreneuring. I was the principal investigator on the ESRC funded Trickle Out Africa Project (2011 – present) which considers the impact of social and environmental enterprises on poverty alleviation and sustainable development across the 19 countries of Southern and Eastern Africa. The online Trickle Out Directory now lists over 2000 social purpose ventures. I am also the UK host of a Newton Advanced Fellowship with Dr Silvia Pinheiro from Brazil on “Inclusion and formalization of Amazonian informal entrepreneurs into MNC value chains – mechanisms, partnerships and impacts”. I also run the South Africa PhD partnership network in Social Entrepreneurship and Social Innovation. I am a member of the ESRC peer review college, a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and a member of the British Council social science funding panel.

I am a Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) at the Department of Government, University of Essex. I specialize in Methodology and Political Economy and I have a strong interest in the Political Economy of Natural Disasters.