Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

Goal 09 Industry Innovation and Infrastructure

Goal 9: Build resilient infrastructure, promote sustainable industrialization and foster innovation

Investments in infrastructure – transport, irrigation, energy and information and communication technology – are crucial to achieving sustainable development and empowering communities in many countries. It has long been recognized that growth in productivity and incomes, and improvements in health and education outcomes require investment in infrastructure.

Inclusive and sustainable industrial development is the primary source of income generation, allows for rapid and sustained increases in living standards for all people, and provides the technological solutions to environmentally sound industrialization.

Technological progress is the foundation of efforts to achieve environmental objectives, such as increased resource and energy-efficiency. Without technology and innovation, industrialization will not happen, and without industrialization, development will not happen.

Interested Scholars

The following scholars are interested in this topic:

I am a Senior Law Lecturer at the University of Malawi: Chancellor College. I hold a Masters of Laws Degree from the University of Essex and a Bachelor of Laws (Honours) Degree from the University of Malawi. I am a visiting Lecturer at the University of Maryland: Francis King Carey School of Law. I co-developed and responsible for teaching the law school’s new Legal Theory and Practice Course: “Environmental Justice, Human Rights and Public Health.” The course was launched in January 2020. I was responsible for the development of environmental law and natural resources modules for Chancellor College.
I teach Environmental and Natural Resources Law, Water Policies, Laws and Institutions, International and Comparative Intellectual Property Law, Constitutional and Administrative Law, and Private International Law at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. I have also taught other courses including International Law and Human Rights Law. I have supervised and assessed numerous student dissertations in Business and Human Rights, Intellectual Property Law, and Environmental Law. I have researched and consulted widely in a number of areas, including intellectual property and access to medicines, seed sovereignty and farmers’ rights, environmental law, disaster risk management, the right to health, rights of vulnerable prisoners. I have served as a facilitator and trainer for the regional training of trainers programme offered by ARASA, I was responsible for intellectual property and access to medicines. The programme involves participants from 18 southern and eastern African countries.

Currently working on issues regarding the future of work, and how technology will impact employment, looking towards policies that can help the workers to prepare for it. I have also interests in understanding the state of food security in Malaysia and the region – the various factors that will impact it.

I am a research assistant at Institue for Empirical Research in Political Economy (IERPE) . I use quantitative methods to evaluate the impact of social reforms in Sub-Saharan Africa with a focus on Benin. I am interested in development economics especially on issues related to agriculture, education and infrastructure.

I am a fourth-year Ph.D. candidate in the Public Policy Program at the John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies at the University of Massachusetts Boston. My core interest is in climate change and digital literacy that empowers nonprofit organizations to use digital environments, social networking sites (SNSs) in particular, to support climate change action. My research agenda explores the relationship between the policy process, communication theory, movement building, and theory of change with a particular focus on the environment, nonprofit advocacy, energy, and technology. I hold a Master’s of Public Policy (2017) from American University in Washington, D.C., and a B.A. in International Relations (2012) from Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, MA. While at American, I was awarded the William K. Reilly Fellowship for my contributions to environmental governance and was inducted into Pi Alpha Alpha, the Public Administration Honor Society, for my scholastic achievements. At Mount Holyoke, I was awarded the Elaine Conde Scholarship (2010), served as the co-chair of the International Student Organizing Committee (ISOC), and was a member of the student advisory board for the McCulloch Center for Global Initiatives.

PhD Candidate Egypt Academic Discipline: Computer/Data Sciences, Economics, Political Science, Public Policy Interests Keywords: Big Data, Computational Models., Decision-Making, development, Disasters, Game Theory, political economy About me: Sustainable Development Goals: Affordable and Clean Energy, Clean Water and Sanitation, Climate Action, Decent Work and Economic Growth, Gender Equality, Good Health and Well-being, Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure, [...]

Dr. China Academic Discipline: Computer/Data Sciences, Economics, Education, History, Political Science, Public Administration, Public Policy, Sociology Interests Keywords: conflict, global governance, international political economy, International Relations, regional development and policy About me: Sustainable Development Goals: Affordable and Clean Energy, Climate Action, Decent Work and Economic Growth, Gender Equality, Good Health and Well-being, Industry, Innovation and [...]

Restructuring History is the most futuristic approach towards Development” is the outlook and motivation with which I explore the arena of Area Studies to arrive at Alternative Development strategies by deriving Alternatives to Development in its current form and practice.
A passionate reader engulfed in designing holistic Geopolitical and Economic policies in integration to the Historical adaptations and approaches to the development of South Asia emphasising on the social, economic, political dimensions I see myself taking up a
leadership role at the United Nations and other intragovernmental agencies as a formidable voice from the developing nations, Modern South Asia in particular.
Having completed my masters in International Relations, my research thesis based on Predicting Conflict through AI while my broader interests lie within the frontiers of International Relations, Regional Development, Geopolitics, Economy, History enabling the Strategic Integration of Social Sciences in terms of Policy Thinking and Field Based Practices across the Global South.

Laurence Piper is a Political Scientist at the University of the Western Cape interested in urban governance, democracy, state-society relations and citizenship in South Africa and comparatively. His latest book is ‘Democracy Disconnected: Participation and Governance in a City of the South’ , Routledge, 2018, with Dr Fiona Anciano. He is the previous President of the South African Association of Political Studies (SAAPS) 2016-8.

Cinema audiences and reception

This project seeks to develop literature on the voices of cinema-going audiences in Nigeria, Ghana (two vibrant Anglophone filmmaking countries on the continent) and other African countries. Very little information exists on the history of spectatorship, audiences’ socio-economic status, viewing preferences and interpretive strategies of African film audiences. Through ethnographic and survey approaches, existing knowledge gaps will be closed with rich and layered descriptions of film spectatorship and audiences. The publications produced from the research will be useful to scholars, filmmakers, cinema operators and investors, who require more than market research surveys for creative intervention. The objectives of the study are to produce an updated history of spectatorship in Nigeria and Ghana, with an overview of contemporary spaces and media of African cinema audiences (including Internet, cinemas, Africa Magic channels etc); to examine and document the socio-economic status, audience preferences and interpretive strategies of African cinema-going audiences in an attempt to close existing knowledge gaps in film scholarship; to complement the audience work which I began in Lagos in July 2016, given that the Nigerian and Ghanaian film industries arguably share commonalities in terms of their postcolonial status, cultural production models and values. The reception of particular filmmakers is welcome.

African film and social change

The impact of films, particularly documentary films, is already being tracked and documented in South Africa. Arguably, the same can hardly be said of scholars working in the eastern and western parts of the continent. In India – where a thriving film industry also exists – social change is attributed to Partition films, for example. And in the United States, the plethora of films that depict politics and history generate huge debates on representational strategies and social change. Several of such films are used as instructional aids in formal learning environments; and the way they shape our knowledge of the world is well-documented. This project examines the social function of films – documentaries and feature-length productions. Where films are used to promote development, peace, reconciliation or conflict resolution, it is of interest to examine how that was achieved. To deal with the objective of measuring the impact of socio-political films, such films have to be strategically exposed to key stakeholders. These include those who are able to effect the desired change i.e. policy makers and researchers, relevant government agencies, social and political activists and non-governmental organisations to mention a few. Therefore, the methods of this project will include historical and contemporary perspectives of film screenings and their effects, focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews of key individuals. This will also broaden the scope of study thus yielding richer analyses of film and social change.

Celebrity studies

This study seeks to examine the motivations of celebrity crossover from entertainment to political office. It is quite common to listen to media celebrities discussing their intentions to create social impact by giving back to the society that contributed to their rise to stardom. Some celebrities believe that this contribution can be achieved by occupying a political office. However, scholars and celebrity fans have expressed reservations about celebrities’ crossover into politics because of a presumed lack of expertise in political affairs. With the huge fan base that some Nigerian celebrities have within and outside the African continent, it is quite easy to promote social causes and create impact through their social media pages without necessarily venturing into politics. And so, being conscious of their positions yet seeking political offices implies that some motivations are unclear to the public. It is therefore necessary to probe the motivations of these celebrities crossing over to hold political offices. Also worthy of scholarly attention are the pains and gains of the crossover as well as the decisions to remain politicians after a term has been served, to return to their previous art or to straddle both worlds. This project will benefit from all the methods applicable to case studies.

I am a Lecturer in International Development and Economics at the University of Westminster. Before this, I held a post-doctoral research position at the University of Oxford’s Department for International Development, where I was involved in a EU FP7-funded project seeking to investigate the impact of Foreign Direct Investment on local development in Ghana. I have also worked as a research consultant for a number of organisations, including Oxford Policy Management, UNU-WIDER, the World Food Programme, and UNDP.

My research is divided into three strands: one examines the impact of FDI in low-income countries, with a specific field focus on Ghana; another one is broadly concerned with social policy in low-income countries; with a more recent focus on health policy and health systems reform in Sub-Saharan Africa; finally, the last strand develops the work on instability and development, which Istarted as part of my doctoral research a few years ago.

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