Decent Work and Economic Growth

Interested Scholars

The following scholars are interested in this topic:

Senior Lecturer and Head of the Department of African Literature, University of the Witwatersrand South Africa Academic Discipline: Anthropology, Cultural Studies, Drama, Theatre, Music, Geography, History, Political Science, Sociology Interests Keywords: gender and sexualities; affect; intimacy; ritual practices/ performances; performance studies; consumption; narrative; pedagogy, women About me: Sustainable Development Goals: Clean Water and Sanitation, Decent [...]

I research comparative regionalism with a special focus on African regions and the EU. I interrogate the ‘Actorships’ of State, non-state and external actors in regionalism/ regional integration in Africa.

I am a global historian focused on West Africa, slavery and its abolition and the history of children and childhoods. Here at the University of Glasgow I work closely with Stephen Mullen, Jelmer Vos and Simon Newman as part of the Slavery Studies Network and I am part of the Centre for Gender History. My work focuses on the importance of children and ideas about childhood to labour regimes, particularly those systems designed to bring an end to slavery.

I am currently doing research into child labour and childcare in Sierra Leone and Liberia. This project, funded by the Leverhulme Trust, examines the relationships between the family home, civilising missions, and Black Diaspora colonisation of West Africa in the 19th century. The publications which have emerged from this project deal with topics as diverse as forced labour, developmental politics and breastfeeding.

I’m also co-leading a project titled Seeking Refuge which is a collaboration between artists, writers, academics and tech professionals to experiment with new ways of presenting information online about people’s experiences of trying to escape enslavement.

Before coming to Glasgow I was a post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Kent from 2015 to 2017 and at the Bayreuth Academy of Advanced African Studies from 2013 to 2015. In these positions I worked closely with the Iwalewahaus art gallery in Bayreuth to explore creative practice based research and with the Centre for the History of Colonialisms to advance the study of imperial and colonial history. I studied for my PhD at the Chair for the History of the Modern World at ETHZ, supervised by Harald Fischer-Tiné and Andreas Eckert. I also have an MSc in History from the London School of Economics where I worked closely with Joanna Lewis.

Before my PhD studies I worked in the charity sector for a Scottish organisation which supported lone parents into education and training. I also spent two years working for the Scottish government as an online learning developer. I maintain an interest in the use of digital and online technologies to overcome social and economic barriers to education.

Currently Associate Professor at the Department of Political Science and International Relations, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa Ethiopia. I have teaching courses in International Relations Theories, Politics of Africa, International Human Rights, International Law and Organizations, Democracy and Development, Contemporary Global Politics and Transnationalism. My current research interests in the main, migration, human rights, conflict resolution, transnational involvement in the Horn of Africa, political communities in Africa.

A Poland and Germany trained legal academician, since five years in East Africa. Interested in comparative research on all areas of constitutional law and law of regional integration. And in Public International Law.

I have recently completed my PhD in Sociology at the University of Essex. My work is part of a growing area of academic scholarship, which challenges the dominant ‘human trafficking’ narratives/discourses. My doctoral research is aimed at exploring the responses to child trafficking in South Asia particularly in Nepal. This research looks at the issues of child trafficking in Nepal by taking a critical stance on the concept of trafficking, by looking at the ways national and international legislations formulate this concepts and how in turn this is made sense of in practice by various law enforces and implementation agencies, including international non-government organisations (INGOs) and non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

I have several years of professional work experience in the field of sexual reproductive health, gender, and human rights issues working with various I/NGOs in Nepal.
I currently teach Policy, Punishment and Society at the University of Essex and I am also a visiting lecturer in Criminology at the University of Roehampton.

Foremost interested in the security-development nexus and state fragility, including insurgency/counterinsurgency and aid approaches. Most of my research is centred upon Afghanistan within the ‘Global War on Terror’ context, however I am additionally interested in sustainability and comprehensive/integrated approaches toward stabilisation. My preferred approach is within phenomenology, qualitative and critical – mostly through a mode of discourse analysis (such as Institutional Frame Analysis).

I am interested in semantics, syntax, and lexical semantics and, especially, the syntax-semantics interface. In particular, I’m interested in the question of possible verb meanings and how the meaning of a verb derives argument realization. My dissertation (completed in May 2016) investigated the interface between verb meaning and morphosyntax in Bantu languages, looking at the syntax and semantics of applicative and causative morphology. Other topics of interest are copular verbs, agreement, grammatical complexity, lexical semantic typology, tense/aspect, and motion predicates. I have conducted fieldwork in East Africa on three languages: Kinyarwanda (Rwanda), Lubukusu (Kenya), and Chichewa (Malawi).

I joined Essex Business School in November 2013. Previously I held posts at Queen’s University Belfast (2007-2013) and Middlesex University Business School (1996-2007). I have published over 100 peer reviewed journal articles, book chapters and conference papers in areas such as social entrepreneurship, hybrid businesses, green supply chain management, the role of business in development, sustainability discourse, and ecopreneuring. I was the principal investigator on the ESRC funded Trickle Out Africa Project (2011 – present) which considers the impact of social and environmental enterprises on poverty alleviation and sustainable development across the 19 countries of Southern and Eastern Africa. The online Trickle Out Directory now lists over 2000 social purpose ventures. I am also the UK host of a Newton Advanced Fellowship with Dr Silvia Pinheiro from Brazil on “Inclusion and formalization of Amazonian informal entrepreneurs into MNC value chains – mechanisms, partnerships and impacts”. I also run the South Africa PhD partnership network in Social Entrepreneurship and Social Innovation. I am a member of the ESRC peer review college, a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and a member of the British Council social science funding panel.

I study the emergence of social movements and campaigns that seek to address socio-political inequalities. I have recently completed my PhD in Government [Political Science] at the University of Essex. My dissertation research focuses on nonviolent resistance, when violent and non-violent conflicts are more likely, as well as state responses to protest events. I utilise both, cross-national samples as well as case studies data in my research. I am currently working as a Research Assistant for the Catalyst Project, University of Essex, Department of Government.

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