Decent Work and Economic Growth

Interested Scholars

The following scholars are interested in this topic:

My main research interests are political economy, comparative politics, and methodology with specialized concentrations in game theory, formal modeling and econometrics. More specifically, I study revolutions, economic development and state repression within countries of the Global South.

I am an Associate Professor of Political Science at Fordham University. I am the co-author of the book “Migration Crises and the Structure of International Cooperation” (University of Georgia Press 2018).

Djamiou Ohounko has nine years of experience enjoying market research and management.
Particularly, he creates, evaluates and executes projects within organizations and also as an external
partner in West Africa. He constructed frameworks for 5+ surveys across key sectors, then trained 200+
surveyors and supervised fieldworks with a cumulative sample of 5,000+ respondents. In addition, he
analyzed data and written many reports for polls as well as managed disseminations.

Besides, serving
his community and promoting sustainable development goals, led him to co-found an environmental and
community based association “La Brigade Verte” (Benin) in 2017. He is in charge of communications
and created awareness for 1,000+ people, managed 3 projects as well as trained 350+ pupils on
environmental issues including climate change. Furthermore, he was part of the team that identified
solutions to improve resilience.

Djamiou holds a Bachelor’s degree in management of organizations and
he is an MBA candidate of African School of Economics. His goal is to pursue a PhD in finance to go in-depth on how financial inclusion foster climate resilience in Africa.

When Mathematics, Economics and Data Science meet together, there’s no business, R&D or ML problem that can’t be solved.

Educator, Scholar, Advocate. A certified teacher passionate about furthering students’ access to education, Bertrand combines strong academics with extensive intercultural experience. In 2013 he graduated from the Higher Teachers Training College of Yaounde in Cameroon and earned a Secondary and High School Teacher’s Certificate. He has served as Mathematics’ teacher in Cameroon in different regions and noticed the disparities in education attainment level and their impact on regional growth. He took the opportunity to hone his skills in Impact Evaluation methods and Statistics at the African School of Economics through a master’s program while serving as a research assistant in Benin. He, therefore, gained valuable skills in addressing issues in education and in Social Science at large. His ability to combine tools from Data Science and Economics to make data-driven decisions gives him the opportunity to participate to addressing some of the most pressing problems face by the world poor.

Restructuring History is the most futuristic approach towards Development” is the outlook and motivation with which I explore the arena of Area Studies to arrive at Alternative Development strategies by deriving Alternatives to Development in its current form and practice.
A passionate reader engulfed in designing holistic Geopolitical and Economic policies in integration to the Historical adaptations and approaches to the development of South Asia emphasising on the social, economic, political dimensions I see myself taking up a
leadership role at the United Nations and other intragovernmental agencies as a formidable voice from the developing nations, Modern South Asia in particular.
Having completed my masters in International Relations, my research thesis based on Predicting Conflict through AI while my broader interests lie within the frontiers of International Relations, Regional Development, Geopolitics, Economy, History enabling the Strategic Integration of Social Sciences in terms of Policy Thinking and Field Based Practices across the Global South.

Laurence Piper is a Political Scientist at the University of the Western Cape interested in urban governance, democracy, state-society relations and citizenship in South Africa and comparatively. His latest book is ‘Democracy Disconnected: Participation and Governance in a City of the South’ , Routledge, 2018, with Dr Fiona Anciano. He is the previous President of the South African Association of Political Studies (SAAPS) 2016-8.

As a global historian of Africa, Marcia C. Schenck is committed to the study of Africa and Africans as an integral part of writing global history. Her research interests follow this concentration, focusing on the nexus between migration, labor, and development between Africa and the world. Her background lies in African Studies and African and global history. Her areas of specialization include the history of southern and Lusophone Africa from the late 19th century to the present, and global history 1850 to the present.

At Princeton University, Schenck defended her dissertation titled Socialist Solidarities and Their Afterlives: Histories and Memories of Angolan and Mozambican Migrants in the German Democratic Republic, 1975-2015 in September 2017. This social history draws on oral histories of Angolan and Mozambican men and women who worked across various industries in the German Democratic Republic (GDR) during the 1980s. Framed by the chronology of the migrants’ life histories, the project discusses the reasons for leavening and returning home, lived experiences regarding production and consumption, integration and exclusion in the GDR, and the present-day legacies of the migration processes in Angola and Mozambique. Schenck is currently transforming her dissertation into a book and publishing on related projects about African migrations during the Cold War period.

Schenck’s latest research project The African Refugee Regime in Global Perspective 1963-1984 traces the historic genesis of the OAU Convention Governing the Specific Aspects of Refugee Problems in Africa within the context of debates about decolonization, pan-Africanism, and the Cold War in Africa.This political and legal history analyzes the history of international organizations such as the UNHCR and the OAU with regard to the formulation of the African refugee regime. The implications of the convention in question, however, cannot be understood without taking into account the formalization of a European refugee regime after the Second World War or considering the discussions about a Latin American regional refugee complex in the early 1980s.

Trained in higher education in emergency settings, Schenck has taught refugee learners in Kakuma refugee camp in the north of Kenya in connection with Professor Jeremy Adelman’s Massive Open Online Course Global History Lab. Schenck remains involved in projects that contribute to redefining access to university level history learning in non-traditional settings. In this context, she is currently reflecting upon the role of humanitarian history-in-action (different from the history of humanitarianism).

I am a political communication scholar with a particular focus on gender. My research interests include gendered mediation, political communication, online campaigning, political marketing, political journalism, African media and journalism and visual communication. Methodically, my expertise is in qualitative research including (multimodal) critical discourse analysis, (elite) interviewing, textual analysis and focus groups. My recent research examined representations of Ghanaian and Nigerian women politicians in print and radio news, as well as their self-representation on social media.

Cinema audiences and reception

This project seeks to develop literature on the voices of cinema-going audiences in Nigeria, Ghana (two vibrant Anglophone filmmaking countries on the continent) and other African countries. Very little information exists on the history of spectatorship, audiences’ socio-economic status, viewing preferences and interpretive strategies of African film audiences. Through ethnographic and survey approaches, existing knowledge gaps will be closed with rich and layered descriptions of film spectatorship and audiences. The publications produced from the research will be useful to scholars, filmmakers, cinema operators and investors, who require more than market research surveys for creative intervention. The objectives of the study are to produce an updated history of spectatorship in Nigeria and Ghana, with an overview of contemporary spaces and media of African cinema audiences (including Internet, cinemas, Africa Magic channels etc); to examine and document the socio-economic status, audience preferences and interpretive strategies of African cinema-going audiences in an attempt to close existing knowledge gaps in film scholarship; to complement the audience work which I began in Lagos in July 2016, given that the Nigerian and Ghanaian film industries arguably share commonalities in terms of their postcolonial status, cultural production models and values. The reception of particular filmmakers is welcome.

African film and social change

The impact of films, particularly documentary films, is already being tracked and documented in South Africa. Arguably, the same can hardly be said of scholars working in the eastern and western parts of the continent. In India – where a thriving film industry also exists – social change is attributed to Partition films, for example. And in the United States, the plethora of films that depict politics and history generate huge debates on representational strategies and social change. Several of such films are used as instructional aids in formal learning environments; and the way they shape our knowledge of the world is well-documented. This project examines the social function of films – documentaries and feature-length productions. Where films are used to promote development, peace, reconciliation or conflict resolution, it is of interest to examine how that was achieved. To deal with the objective of measuring the impact of socio-political films, such films have to be strategically exposed to key stakeholders. These include those who are able to effect the desired change i.e. policy makers and researchers, relevant government agencies, social and political activists and non-governmental organisations to mention a few. Therefore, the methods of this project will include historical and contemporary perspectives of film screenings and their effects, focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews of key individuals. This will also broaden the scope of study thus yielding richer analyses of film and social change.

Celebrity studies

This study seeks to examine the motivations of celebrity crossover from entertainment to political office. It is quite common to listen to media celebrities discussing their intentions to create social impact by giving back to the society that contributed to their rise to stardom. Some celebrities believe that this contribution can be achieved by occupying a political office. However, scholars and celebrity fans have expressed reservations about celebrities’ crossover into politics because of a presumed lack of expertise in political affairs. With the huge fan base that some Nigerian celebrities have within and outside the African continent, it is quite easy to promote social causes and create impact through their social media pages without necessarily venturing into politics. And so, being conscious of their positions yet seeking political offices implies that some motivations are unclear to the public. It is therefore necessary to probe the motivations of these celebrities crossing over to hold political offices. Also worthy of scholarly attention are the pains and gains of the crossover as well as the decisions to remain politicians after a term has been served, to return to their previous art or to straddle both worlds. This project will benefit from all the methods applicable to case studies.

I am a Lecturer in International Development and Economics at the University of Westminster. Before this, I held a post-doctoral research position at the University of Oxford’s Department for International Development, where I was involved in a EU FP7-funded project seeking to investigate the impact of Foreign Direct Investment on local development in Ghana. I have also worked as a research consultant for a number of organisations, including Oxford Policy Management, UNU-WIDER, the World Food Programme, and UNDP.

My research is divided into three strands: one examines the impact of FDI in low-income countries, with a specific field focus on Ghana; another one is broadly concerned with social policy in low-income countries; with a more recent focus on health policy and health systems reform in Sub-Saharan Africa; finally, the last strand develops the work on instability and development, which Istarted as part of my doctoral research a few years ago.

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