governance

Interested Scholars

The following scholars are interested in this topic:

Mara Torres Pinedo is a Ph.D. candidate at the Institute for Global Prosperity at University College London. Her research focuses on how different individual attributes such as gender, migration status, and further socio-economic and risk perception characteristics, drive people’s institutional network connectivity to prepare, cope, and recover from disasters. Before starting her Ph.D., Mara achieved an MSc in Risk, Disaster and Resilience at UCL and a BA in International Relations. Before coming to the
UK to pursue her postgraduate studies, Mara worked as a Development practitioner for over 9 years in her natal Mexico, as well as in Colombia, El Salvador, Honduras and the US.

I am a political scientist by training and an interdisciplinary scholar at the core.
Interdisciplinary trajectories allow me to see the deficiencies of hyper disciplinary commitments and complementary possibilities when identity politics (the idea that who are matters as a foundation of institutions) meets conventional political/institutional analyses (the idea that institutions/ organizations matter before or beyond identity). My conversation partners range from Anthropologists to sociologist, to theologians and policy analysts, to reference a few. See my interests keywords and let’s get in touch at the intersection of our encounter.

Assistant Professor United States Academic Discipline: Political Science Interests Keywords: Civil Society, Elections, Gender Politics, governance About me: Sustainable Development Goals: Gender Equality, Justice and Strong Institutions, No Poverty, Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions, Quality Education I am interested in the following geographical area(s): Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Eastern Mediterranean States, Gulf States, [...]

My research investigates the political economy of governance and environmental management in developing countries. One main strand of my research addresses the ways that foreign donors can support better environmental management in the countries where they work. My book Giving Aid Effectively examines when and why member states and civil society groups can make the multilateral development banks, which manage approximately half of all international development finance, responsive to their environmental performance. Other recent projects investigate when foreign aid catalyzes private sector investment in emerging technologies, when externally-financed institution building persists over time, and how remotely sensed data can be used as part of geospatial impact evaluation to improve the evidence behind environment and development interventions.

Another main strand of my research investigates experimentally the effects of transparency on governance and political accountability. I am currently leading or co-leading several field experiments that investigate when information about the programmatic performance of politicians changes vote choice, whether citizen-sourced data on public services improves the governance of urban public services, how transparency encourages citizens to seek accountability from governments, why national-level transparency rating programs affect the actions of local governments in authoritarian contexts. All of these field experiments are designed and implemented as part of strong partnerships with implementing agencies around the world.

My research interests include conflict and cooperation, democratization, and research methods, including data development and data analysis. For more information, see my personal webpage http://ksgleditsch.com