United States

Interested Scholars

The following scholars are interested in this topic:

I am a fourth-year Ph.D. candidate in the Public Policy Program at the John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies at the University of Massachusetts Boston. My core interest is in climate change and digital literacy that empowers nonprofit organizations to use digital environments, social networking sites (SNSs) in particular, to support climate change action. My research agenda explores the relationship between the policy process, communication theory, movement building, and theory of change with a particular focus on the environment, nonprofit advocacy, energy, and technology. I hold a Master’s of Public Policy (2017) from American University in Washington, D.C., and a B.A. in International Relations (2012) from Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, MA. While at American, I was awarded the William K. Reilly Fellowship for my contributions to environmental governance and was inducted into Pi Alpha Alpha, the Public Administration Honor Society, for my scholastic achievements. At Mount Holyoke, I was awarded the Elaine Conde Scholarship (2010), served as the co-chair of the International Student Organizing Committee (ISOC), and was a member of the student advisory board for the McCulloch Center for Global Initiatives.

My main research interests are political economy, comparative politics, and methodology with specialized concentrations in game theory, formal modeling and econometrics. More specifically, I study revolutions, economic development and state repression within countries of the Global South.

MA Political Science Candidate and Graduate Research Assistant at Simon Fraser University, Canada.

Contracted Political Science Research Assistant with the Government of Moncton, NB.

Research areas include comparative politics, electoral politics, application of game theory to Political Science, and minorities and gender politics. Regional interests are North America, South Asia, and Southeast Asia.

I study how social identity affects electoral accountability, the functioning of government, and political behaviour. My work lies at the intersection of Political Economy, Political Behaviour, Experimental Methods, and Political Psychology. In my research I build on strategic and behavioural theories of principal-agent relationships and voting. I implement experiments to analyse how individuals evaluate their politicians’ performance, when they discriminate in favour of their social group, how they make redistributive allocation decisions, or how they coordinate their choices with their peers.