Southern Africa

Interested Scholars

The following scholars are interested in this topic:

Chiletso Kumadzi Msang’azi, UN-World Food Programme-Ethiopia. Experienced program professional with a demonstrated history of working in Education and Humanitarian sectors. Skilled in School Feeding Programme, Supplementary Feeding Programmes, General Food Distribution, Early Childhood Development, Livelihood and Resilience, Community Engagement, Children’s Rights, Teaching and Monitoring and Evaluation in the context of Humanitarian Crisis.

Witness Tapani Alfonso
Areas of Expertise: Education; Social Protection; Development, Disaster; Gender Equality; Monitoring & Evaluation; Governance; Public health and Political economy
Witness Alfonso is a senior research associate at the Institute of Public Opinion and Research (IPOR). With over six years of experience conducting research and managing projects in Malawi, Alfonso is an expert in both qualitative and quantitative research designs, team training, fieldwork management, and data analysis. He has led large-scale data collections using both paper and electronic data collection systems, conducting research in the areas of education, food security, disaster, gender, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), governance, monitoring and evaluation, and political economy.
Alfonso has worked on research projects with both local and international researchers and organisation that include Centre for Evaluation and Development (Germany), University of Notre Dame, Programme on Governance and Local Development at the University of Gothenburg (Sweden), Overseas Development Institute, M&C Saatchi World Services, Girl Effect Malawi, Open Society Initiative for Southern Africa, Afrobarometer, UNICEF Malawi and the World Bank. He holds a Master of Arts degree in Development studies obtained from the University of Malawi.

Cristina Rodrigues combines her extensive regional experience – particularly in the Portuguese speaking countries – with a doctorate degree in African Studies in Social Sciences from the University Institute of Lisbon in Portugal. She brings more than a decade of research and evaluation experience on United Nations, European Union, USAID, and government-funded projects in Africa. Her experience includes conducting baseline assessments, surveys, mid-term and final program evaluations, project evaluations for child labour, human trafficking, gender policy, civil society, social protection, education and environmental protection activities in Africa. She is currently a Senior Researcher with the Nordic Africa Institute in Sweden. She speaks fluent English, Portuguese, Spanish and French.

My main research interests are political economy, comparative politics, and methodology with specialized concentrations in game theory, formal modeling and econometrics. More specifically, I study revolutions, economic development and state repression within countries of the Global South.

I mainly do research on the history of the British Empire and the Commonwealth. I am also interested in inter-imperial relations, particularly those between the British Empire and the Japanese Empire in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Since I dealt with the transition of British external policy toward its first application to join the European Economic Community (EEC) from the Anglo-American and Commonwealth perspectives in my doctoral thesis (which was submitted to Kyoto University, Japan, in 2006), I am still interested in European Integration as well as Britain’s relations with its Commonwealth partners.

As a global historian of Africa, Marcia C. Schenck is committed to the study of Africa and Africans as an integral part of writing global history. Her research interests follow this concentration, focusing on the nexus between migration, labor, and development between Africa and the world. Her background lies in African Studies and African and global history. Her areas of specialization include the history of southern and Lusophone Africa from the late 19th century to the present, and global history 1850 to the present.

At Princeton University, Schenck defended her dissertation titled Socialist Solidarities and Their Afterlives: Histories and Memories of Angolan and Mozambican Migrants in the German Democratic Republic, 1975-2015 in September 2017. This social history draws on oral histories of Angolan and Mozambican men and women who worked across various industries in the German Democratic Republic (GDR) during the 1980s. Framed by the chronology of the migrants’ life histories, the project discusses the reasons for leavening and returning home, lived experiences regarding production and consumption, integration and exclusion in the GDR, and the present-day legacies of the migration processes in Angola and Mozambique. Schenck is currently transforming her dissertation into a book and publishing on related projects about African migrations during the Cold War period.

Schenck’s latest research project The African Refugee Regime in Global Perspective 1963-1984 traces the historic genesis of the OAU Convention Governing the Specific Aspects of Refugee Problems in Africa within the context of debates about decolonization, pan-Africanism, and the Cold War in Africa.This political and legal history analyzes the history of international organizations such as the UNHCR and the OAU with regard to the formulation of the African refugee regime. The implications of the convention in question, however, cannot be understood without taking into account the formalization of a European refugee regime after the Second World War or considering the discussions about a Latin American regional refugee complex in the early 1980s.

Trained in higher education in emergency settings, Schenck has taught refugee learners in Kakuma refugee camp in the north of Kenya in connection with Professor Jeremy Adelman’s Massive Open Online Course Global History Lab. Schenck remains involved in projects that contribute to redefining access to university level history learning in non-traditional settings. In this context, she is currently reflecting upon the role of humanitarian history-in-action (different from the history of humanitarianism).

I am a Lecturer in International Development and Economics at the University of Westminster. Before this, I held a post-doctoral research position at the University of Oxford’s Department for International Development, where I was involved in a EU FP7-funded project seeking to investigate the impact of Foreign Direct Investment on local development in Ghana. I have also worked as a research consultant for a number of organisations, including Oxford Policy Management, UNU-WIDER, the World Food Programme, and UNDP.

My research is divided into three strands: one examines the impact of FDI in low-income countries, with a specific field focus on Ghana; another one is broadly concerned with social policy in low-income countries; with a more recent focus on health policy and health systems reform in Sub-Saharan Africa; finally, the last strand develops the work on instability and development, which Istarted as part of my doctoral research a few years ago.

Senior Lecturer and Head of the Department of African Literature, University of the Witwatersrand South Africa Academic Discipline: Anthropology, Cultural Studies, Drama, Theatre, Music, Geography, History, Political Science, Sociology Interests Keywords: gender and sexualities; affect; intimacy; ritual practices/ performances; performance studies; consumption; narrative; pedagogy, women About me: Sustainable Development Goals: Clean Water and Sanitation, Decent [...]

My research I work on the Timbuktu manuscripts, more specifically Islamic legal opinions, a genre of Islamic law (legal literature) as a historical source for the everyday lives and practices of Timbuktu’s wives and Muslim jurist consults during the colonial era (1907 – 1950). I also work on Timbuktu’s seventeenth, nineteenth and twentieth-century chronicles. However, I am also interested in decoloniality. The Timbuktu manuscripts as one of many precolonial written intellectual traditions in Africa constitute an archive toward decoloniality. (With Africa I mean the whole continent, not just so-called Sub-Saharan Africa as apart from so-called North Africa; this divide is a construct of a past colonialism and and existing coloniality). Teaching the Study of Religion I am interested in foundational religious texts and religious-intellectual traditions.

Currently, am an executive Director of a research based NGO that focuses on Ageing & Dementia in East and Central Africa. Our mandate is to contribute to the knowledge base as well as policy in advancing the key issues that pertain older persons in later years.

I have the expertise, research in ageing, dementia,leadership, training and motivation necessary to successfully carry out the proposed research projects. I have a broad background in Nursing, with specific training aging and demography, public health, health systems management and policy. I have participated in teaching and supervision of undergraduate Nursing students. I possess ten years’ experience in both public health and local health systems (LHS) Management, health systems and policy

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