South Asia

Interested Scholars

The following scholars are interested in this topic:

My research investigates the political economy of governance and environmental management in developing countries. One main strand of my research addresses the ways that foreign donors can support better environmental management in the countries where they work. My book Giving Aid Effectively examines when and why member states and civil society groups can make the multilateral development banks, which manage approximately half of all international development finance, responsive to their environmental performance. Other recent projects investigate when foreign aid catalyzes private sector investment in emerging technologies, when externally-financed institution building persists over time, and how remotely sensed data can be used as part of geospatial impact evaluation to improve the evidence behind environment and development interventions.

Another main strand of my research investigates experimentally the effects of transparency on governance and political accountability. I am currently leading or co-leading several field experiments that investigate when information about the programmatic performance of politicians changes vote choice, whether citizen-sourced data on public services improves the governance of urban public services, how transparency encourages citizens to seek accountability from governments, why national-level transparency rating programs affect the actions of local governments in authoritarian contexts. All of these field experiments are designed and implemented as part of strong partnerships with implementing agencies around the world.

Foremost interested in the security-development nexus and state fragility, including insurgency/counterinsurgency and aid approaches. Most of my research is centred upon Afghanistan within the ‘Global War on Terror’ context, however I am additionally interested in sustainability and comprehensive/integrated approaches toward stabilisation. My preferred approach is within phenomenology, qualitative and critical – mostly through a mode of discourse analysis (such as Institutional Frame Analysis).

My research was inspired by the wide concern about the security implications of climate change. I especially pay attention to the mechanism under which climate variability might exacerbate different types of intrastate conflicts, including non-violent and violent conflicts. In addition, I am also interested in how information-driven coordinating collective phenomena unfold with security threats in place. Specifically, I will focus on the signal processing between political elites and mass public to identify the relationship between information signal processing and the diffusion of conflicts in space and time. Individuals do not form opinions, beliefs, and actions in an isolated environment but are exposed to social influence through social networks and physical, ideological, cultural, or emotional proximity to others.

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