Public Administration

Interested Scholars

The following scholars are interested in this topic:

Mara Torres Pinedo is a Ph.D. candidate at the Institute for Global Prosperity at University College London. Her research focuses on how different individual attributes such as gender, migration status, and further socio-economic and risk perception characteristics, drive people’s institutional network connectivity to prepare, cope, and recover from disasters. Before starting her Ph.D., Mara achieved an MSc in Risk, Disaster and Resilience at UCL and a BA in International Relations. Before coming to the
UK to pursue her postgraduate studies, Mara worked as a Development practitioner for over 9 years in her natal Mexico, as well as in Colombia, El Salvador, Honduras and the US.

I am a fourth-year Ph.D. candidate in the Public Policy Program at the John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies at the University of Massachusetts Boston. My core interest is in climate change and digital literacy that empowers nonprofit organizations to use digital environments, social networking sites (SNSs) in particular, to support climate change action. My research agenda explores the relationship between the policy process, communication theory, movement building, and theory of change with a particular focus on the environment, nonprofit advocacy, energy, and technology. I hold a Master’s of Public Policy (2017) from American University in Washington, D.C., and a B.A. in International Relations (2012) from Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, MA. While at American, I was awarded the William K. Reilly Fellowship for my contributions to environmental governance and was inducted into Pi Alpha Alpha, the Public Administration Honor Society, for my scholastic achievements. At Mount Holyoke, I was awarded the Elaine Conde Scholarship (2010), served as the co-chair of the International Student Organizing Committee (ISOC), and was a member of the student advisory board for the McCulloch Center for Global Initiatives.

Dr. China Academic Discipline: Computer/Data Sciences, Economics, Education, History, Political Science, Public Administration, Public Policy, Sociology Interests Keywords: conflict, global governance, international political economy, International Relations, regional development and policy About me: Sustainable Development Goals: Affordable and Clean Energy, Climate Action, Decent Work and Economic Growth, Gender Equality, Good Health and Well-being, Industry, Innovation and [...]

Xiaoli Lu (PhD Utrecht University) is Associate Professor at Tsinghua University’s School of Public Policy and Management, and Associate Director at Tsinghua’s Center for Crisis Management Research. Lu has published widely on topics of Crisis and Disaster Management, and Organizational issues. His most recent book is Managing Uncertainty in Crisis: Exploring the Impact of Institutionalization on Organizational Sense Making. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation of China, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Science and Technology, Beijing Social Science Foundation and Beijing Earthquake Administration. He serves on the editorial boards of the Journals Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy and Journal of Risk, Disaster & Crisis Research (in Chinese), and the board of the China Society of Emergency Management. He is also the founder of the China Crisis Management Website (www.crisis119.org), and the co-founder of the Youth Sub-forum and Summer School affiliated to the Forum of Fifty on Emergency Management.

Restructuring History is the most futuristic approach towards Development” is the outlook and motivation with which I explore the arena of Area Studies to arrive at Alternative Development strategies by deriving Alternatives to Development in its current form and practice.
A passionate reader engulfed in designing holistic Geopolitical and Economic policies in integration to the Historical adaptations and approaches to the development of South Asia emphasising on the social, economic, political dimensions I see myself taking up a
leadership role at the United Nations and other intragovernmental agencies as a formidable voice from the developing nations, Modern South Asia in particular.
Having completed my masters in International Relations, my research thesis based on Predicting Conflict through AI while my broader interests lie within the frontiers of International Relations, Regional Development, Geopolitics, Economy, History enabling the Strategic Integration of Social Sciences in terms of Policy Thinking and Field Based Practices across the Global South.

I am a political scientist by training and an interdisciplinary scholar at the core.
Interdisciplinary trajectories allow me to see the deficiencies of hyper disciplinary commitments and complementary possibilities when identity politics (the idea that who are matters as a foundation of institutions) meets conventional political/institutional analyses (the idea that institutions/ organizations matter before or beyond identity). My conversation partners range from Anthropologists to sociologist, to theologians and policy analysts, to reference a few. See my interests keywords and let’s get in touch at the intersection of our encounter.

I research comparative regionalism with a special focus on African regions and the EU. I interrogate the ‘Actorships’ of State, non-state and external actors in regionalism/ regional integration in Africa.

Gibrán Cruz-Martínez is a Juan de la Cierva Postdoctoral Researcher at the Institute of Public Goods and Policies, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and a Research Associate at the Chilean Institute of Municipal Studies, Universidad Autónoma de Chile. Before joining IPP-CSIC, he was affiliated to the University of Agder (Norway), and the Institute of the Americas, University College London (United Kingdom). He holds a PhD in Political Science from the Universidad Complutense (Spain). His work broadly speaking focuses on the development of emerging welfare states in Latin America and the Caribbean and its relationship to multidimensional poverty and inequality. In addition, his research interests include welfare regimes and social risks in marginalised communities, targeting versus universalism in social protection, and basic universal social pensions in low- and middle-income countries.

Gibrán is the author of several peer-reviewed articles in journals such as Social Indicators Research, Bulletin of Latin American Research, Ageing International, Brazilian Journal of Latin American Studies, Política y Sociedad, and Relaciones Internacionales. His most recent publication is an open access book entitled ‘Produciendo Bienestar: Una mirada desde las comunidades marginadas en Puerto Rico’ (Dykinson, 2017). He has been a visiting researcher or fellow at the University of Oxford (United Kingdom), Lund University (Sweden), Centre for Social Research (Puerto Rico), the Comparative Research Programme on Poverty at the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Institute of Latin American Studies at the University of London (United Kingdom). He is also a member of the Editorial Board of Alternautas – an open access blog and Journal on Latin American critical development studies.

My research investigates the political economy of governance and environmental management in developing countries. One main strand of my research addresses the ways that foreign donors can support better environmental management in the countries where they work. My book Giving Aid Effectively examines when and why member states and civil society groups can make the multilateral development banks, which manage approximately half of all international development finance, responsive to their environmental performance. Other recent projects investigate when foreign aid catalyzes private sector investment in emerging technologies, when externally-financed institution building persists over time, and how remotely sensed data can be used as part of geospatial impact evaluation to improve the evidence behind environment and development interventions.

Another main strand of my research investigates experimentally the effects of transparency on governance and political accountability. I am currently leading or co-leading several field experiments that investigate when information about the programmatic performance of politicians changes vote choice, whether citizen-sourced data on public services improves the governance of urban public services, how transparency encourages citizens to seek accountability from governments, why national-level transparency rating programs affect the actions of local governments in authoritarian contexts. All of these field experiments are designed and implemented as part of strong partnerships with implementing agencies around the world.

Dr. Daniel Rio Tinto holds a Ph.D. in Political Science and International Studies at the University of Birmingham (UK), where he worked with the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security (ICCS). His doctoral thesis is entitled ‘Tracing the Security Dilemma in Civil Wars: how fear and insecurity can lead to intra-state violence?’ and evaluates the performance of the Security Dilemma as an explanation for the outbreak of violence in civil wars, drawing from the cases of post-decolonization violence in Angola and Mozambique. Daniel also holds a Master in Political Science and International Relations at the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Lisbon’s New University (NOVA-FCSH) and a BA in International Relations from Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio). Daniel’s broad research interests include International Relations Theory, International Security, Conflict Studies, Defence Studies, Political Violence, Civil Wars & Intra-State Conflicts, Nuclear Politics, The Changing Character of War, Insurgencies & Asymmetric Warfare, Peace Operations, Civil Defence & Safety, Strategy on Conventional (Air, Land & Sea) & Non-Conventional (NBC, Remote, Cyber, Space) Environments, Case-study Methodology and Process Tracing Techniques. His regional expertise covers sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America.

Currently, Dr. Rio Tinto is a Nuclear Security Fellow (Stanton Foundation) with the School of International Relations, Fundação Getúlio Vargas, São Paulo (FGV-SP), where he is working on a project on the impact of armed violence and criminal activities on the nuclear security challenges and policies, particularly looking at Brazil’s context, and part of a wider project on the relationship between nuclear politics and internal conflict. Previously, Daniel has contributed to the Brazilian Naval War College (EGN), the Brazilian Peace Operations Joint Training Center (CCOPAB), the Portuguese Institute of International Relations (IPRI), the Portuguese Institute for National Defence (IDN) and Oxford Analytica.

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