Political Science

Interested Scholars

The following scholars are interested in this topic:

Gibrán Cruz-Martínez is a Juan de la Cierva Postdoctoral Researcher at the Institute of Public Goods and Policies, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and a Research Associate at the Chilean Institute of Municipal Studies, Universidad Autónoma de Chile. Before joining IPP-CSIC, he was affiliated to the University of Agder (Norway), and the Institute of the Americas, University College London (United Kingdom). He holds a PhD in Political Science from the Universidad Complutense (Spain). His work broadly speaking focuses on the development of emerging welfare states in Latin America and the Caribbean and its relationship to multidimensional poverty and inequality. In addition, his research interests include welfare regimes and social risks in marginalised communities, targeting versus universalism in social protection, and basic universal social pensions in low- and middle-income countries.

Gibrán is the author of several peer-reviewed articles in journals such as Social Indicators Research, Bulletin of Latin American Research, Ageing International, Brazilian Journal of Latin American Studies, Política y Sociedad, and Relaciones Internacionales. His most recent publication is an open access book entitled ‘Produciendo Bienestar: Una mirada desde las comunidades marginadas en Puerto Rico’ (Dykinson, 2017). He has been a visiting researcher or fellow at the University of Oxford (United Kingdom), Lund University (Sweden), Centre for Social Research (Puerto Rico), the Comparative Research Programme on Poverty at the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Institute of Latin American Studies at the University of London (United Kingdom). He is also a member of the Editorial Board of Alternautas – an open access blog and Journal on Latin American critical development studies.

Assistant Professor United States Academic Discipline: Political Science Interests Keywords: Civil Society, Elections, Gender Politics, governance About me: Sustainable Development Goals: Gender Equality, Justice and Strong Institutions, No Poverty, Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions, Quality Education I am interested in the following geographical area(s): Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Eastern Mediterranean States, Gulf States, [...]

My research investigates the political economy of governance and environmental management in developing countries. One main strand of my research addresses the ways that foreign donors can support better environmental management in the countries where they work. My book Giving Aid Effectively examines when and why member states and civil society groups can make the multilateral development banks, which manage approximately half of all international development finance, responsive to their environmental performance. Other recent projects investigate when foreign aid catalyzes private sector investment in emerging technologies, when externally-financed institution building persists over time, and how remotely sensed data can be used as part of geospatial impact evaluation to improve the evidence behind environment and development interventions.

Another main strand of my research investigates experimentally the effects of transparency on governance and political accountability. I am currently leading or co-leading several field experiments that investigate when information about the programmatic performance of politicians changes vote choice, whether citizen-sourced data on public services improves the governance of urban public services, how transparency encourages citizens to seek accountability from governments, why national-level transparency rating programs affect the actions of local governments in authoritarian contexts. All of these field experiments are designed and implemented as part of strong partnerships with implementing agencies around the world.

Current research is in the area of global environmental politics; governance and political structures at the local level through to the level of international organisations that include the United Nations and the World Bank; the participation of indigenous peoples in global governance; and the role of the indigenous peoples of Ecuador in environmental protection based on fieldwork conducted in 2016. Ongoing primary research in New York with participants from Ecuadorian indigenous communities, environmental lawyers and Corporate Social Responsibility institutions.

Dr. Daniel Rio Tinto holds a Ph.D. in Political Science and International Studies at the University of Birmingham (UK), where he worked with the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security (ICCS). His doctoral thesis is entitled ‘Tracing the Security Dilemma in Civil Wars: how fear and insecurity can lead to intra-state violence?’ and evaluates the performance of the Security Dilemma as an explanation for the outbreak of violence in civil wars, drawing from the cases of post-decolonization violence in Angola and Mozambique. Daniel also holds a Master in Political Science and International Relations at the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Lisbon’s New University (NOVA-FCSH) and a BA in International Relations from Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio). Daniel’s broad research interests include International Relations Theory, International Security, Conflict Studies, Defence Studies, Political Violence, Civil Wars & Intra-State Conflicts, Nuclear Politics, The Changing Character of War, Insurgencies & Asymmetric Warfare, Peace Operations, Civil Defence & Safety, Strategy on Conventional (Air, Land & Sea) & Non-Conventional (NBC, Remote, Cyber, Space) Environments, Case-study Methodology and Process Tracing Techniques. His regional expertise covers sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America.

Currently, Dr. Rio Tinto is a Nuclear Security Fellow (Stanton Foundation) with the School of International Relations, Fundação Getúlio Vargas, São Paulo (FGV-SP), where he is working on a project on the impact of armed violence and criminal activities on the nuclear security challenges and policies, particularly looking at Brazil’s context, and part of a wider project on the relationship between nuclear politics and internal conflict. Previously, Daniel has contributed to the Brazilian Naval War College (EGN), the Brazilian Peace Operations Joint Training Center (CCOPAB), the Portuguese Institute of International Relations (IPRI), the Portuguese Institute for National Defence (IDN) and Oxford Analytica.

Foremost interested in the security-development nexus and state fragility, including insurgency/counterinsurgency and aid approaches. Most of my research is centred upon Afghanistan within the ‘Global War on Terror’ context, however I am additionally interested in sustainability and comprehensive/integrated approaches toward stabilisation. My preferred approach is within phenomenology, qualitative and critical – mostly through a mode of discourse analysis (such as Institutional Frame Analysis).

My research interests include conflict and cooperation, democratization, and research methods, including data development and data analysis. For more information, see my personal webpage http://ksgleditsch.com

Lecturer (Assistant Professor) United Kingdom Academic Discipline: Political Science Interests Keywords: political economy; global governance and organizations; environmental policy; international crises About me: Sustainable Development Goals: Affordable and Clean Energy, Climate Action I am interested in the following geographical area(s): Europe, Western Hemisphere Components of the GCRF I am interested in: Projects on comparative politics [...]

I hold a PhD in public international law and political science from the school of law of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. The theme of the thesis is human security within the framework of collective security and the use of force. I am currently a post- doc researcher in international law at the University of Macedonia and member of the International Laboratory for International Studies in the Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean, which is located at the school of Economics and Political Science of Aristotle University. Apart from public international law I have studied at the postgraduate level, public law, focusing on migrants’ rights and political philosophy and I have conducted my Mphil at international terrorism. I have presented papers in international conferences and I have publications in international journals. I am a lawyer, focusing on human and refugee rights. I am also a columnist and politically active in Greece. I am currently working on issues related to Artificial Intelligence.

Dr. Leah Windsor is a Research Assistant Professor in the Institute for Intelligent Systems at The University of Memphis. She received her Bachelor of Science in Linguistics from Georgetown University in 1998, her Master’s degree in Political Science at The University of Memphis in 2005, and her Ph.D. in Political Science from The University of Mississippi in 2012. Dr. Windsor currently serves as PI for a Minerva Initiative grant administered by the U.S. Department of Defense that examines political communication in authoritarian regimes and opaque political groups. Her work uses computational linguistics and discourse analysis to answer questions about regime survival, political crisis and conflict, propaganda and persuasion, bluffs and threats, governance, and radicalization. Her interdisciplinary approach to understanding political language is situated at the intersection of political science, psychology, cognitive science, computer science, neurobiology, methodology, and linguistics. Dr. Windsor was selected as Smart City Fellow with the City of Memphis and the FedEx Institute of Technology where she analyzes issues in local Memphis politics. She is also interested in issues of bias and ethnocentrism in studying political language, including corpus selection, translation, and document preparation. In February 2017, Dr. Windsor’s lab was selected for a Team Initiation Grant by the University of Memphis’ Division of Research and Sponsored Programs to study how multimodal forms of communication including language, nonverbal cues, and audiovisual elements, can inform our understanding of methods of persuasion, elements of cognition, keys to decoding deception, and locus of attention. Dr. Windsor is also co-authoring a book on family formation in academia that presents research from an international survey about academic parents. Most recently she was invited to present her work to the National Academy of Sciences and the Department of Defense. Her work has been published in Terrorism and Political Violence, International Interactions, The International Feminist Journal of Politics, and Political Research Quarterly.

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