History

Interested Scholars

The following scholars are interested in this topic:

I am a global historian focused on West Africa, slavery and its abolition and the history of children and childhoods. Here at the University of Glasgow I work closely with Stephen Mullen, Jelmer Vos and Simon Newman as part of the Slavery Studies Network and I am part of the Centre for Gender History. My work focuses on the importance of children and ideas about childhood to labour regimes, particularly those systems designed to bring an end to slavery.

I am currently doing research into child labour and childcare in Sierra Leone and Liberia. This project, funded by the Leverhulme Trust, examines the relationships between the family home, civilising missions, and Black Diaspora colonisation of West Africa in the 19th century. The publications which have emerged from this project deal with topics as diverse as forced labour, developmental politics and breastfeeding.

I’m also co-leading a project titled Seeking Refuge which is a collaboration between artists, writers, academics and tech professionals to experiment with new ways of presenting information online about people’s experiences of trying to escape enslavement.

Before coming to Glasgow I was a post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Kent from 2015 to 2017 and at the Bayreuth Academy of Advanced African Studies from 2013 to 2015. In these positions I worked closely with the Iwalewahaus art gallery in Bayreuth to explore creative practice based research and with the Centre for the History of Colonialisms to advance the study of imperial and colonial history. I studied for my PhD at the Chair for the History of the Modern World at ETHZ, supervised by Harald Fischer-Tiné and Andreas Eckert. I also have an MSc in History from the London School of Economics where I worked closely with Joanna Lewis.

Before my PhD studies I worked in the charity sector for a Scottish organisation which supported lone parents into education and training. I also spent two years working for the Scottish government as an online learning developer. I maintain an interest in the use of digital and online technologies to overcome social and economic barriers to education.

Dr. Daniel Rio Tinto holds a Ph.D. in Political Science and International Studies at the University of Birmingham (UK), where he worked with the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security (ICCS). His doctoral thesis is entitled ‘Tracing the Security Dilemma in Civil Wars: how fear and insecurity can lead to intra-state violence?’ and evaluates the performance of the Security Dilemma as an explanation for the outbreak of violence in civil wars, drawing from the cases of post-decolonization violence in Angola and Mozambique. Daniel also holds a Master in Political Science and International Relations at the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Lisbon’s New University (NOVA-FCSH) and a BA in International Relations from Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio). Daniel’s broad research interests include International Relations Theory, International Security, Conflict Studies, Defence Studies, Political Violence, Civil Wars & Intra-State Conflicts, Nuclear Politics, The Changing Character of War, Insurgencies & Asymmetric Warfare, Peace Operations, Civil Defence & Safety, Strategy on Conventional (Air, Land & Sea) & Non-Conventional (NBC, Remote, Cyber, Space) Environments, Case-study Methodology and Process Tracing Techniques. His regional expertise covers sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America.

Currently, Dr. Rio Tinto is a Nuclear Security Fellow (Stanton Foundation) with the School of International Relations, Fundação Getúlio Vargas, São Paulo (FGV-SP), where he is working on a project on the impact of armed violence and criminal activities on the nuclear security challenges and policies, particularly looking at Brazil’s context, and part of a wider project on the relationship between nuclear politics and internal conflict. Previously, Daniel has contributed to the Brazilian Naval War College (EGN), the Brazilian Peace Operations Joint Training Center (CCOPAB), the Portuguese Institute of International Relations (IPRI), the Portuguese Institute for National Defence (IDN) and Oxford Analytica.

Foremost interested in the security-development nexus and state fragility, including insurgency/counterinsurgency and aid approaches. Most of my research is centred upon Afghanistan within the ‘Global War on Terror’ context, however I am additionally interested in sustainability and comprehensive/integrated approaches toward stabilisation. My preferred approach is within phenomenology, qualitative and critical – mostly through a mode of discourse analysis (such as Institutional Frame Analysis).

1 2