Cultural Studies

Interested Scholars

The following scholars are interested in this topic:

PhD student in Demography (PPGDEM / UFRN), Master in Demography at PPGDEM / UFRN, graduated in Social Sciences at UFRN. Its performance themes involve fertility dynamics, reproductive preferences, sexual and reproductive health, gender relations, female empowerment and sociodemographic analyzes. He is interested in the areas of Fertility, Family Demography, Demographic Dynamics, Education Demography, Quantitative Sociology, Classical and Contemporary Sociology and Political Science.

Restructuring History is the most futuristic approach towards Development” is the outlook and motivation with which I explore the arena of Area Studies to arrive at Alternative Development strategies by deriving Alternatives to Development in its current form and practice.
A passionate reader engulfed in designing holistic Geopolitical and Economic policies in integration to the Historical adaptations and approaches to the development of South Asia emphasising on the social, economic, political dimensions I see myself taking up a
leadership role at the United Nations and other intragovernmental agencies as a formidable voice from the developing nations, Modern South Asia in particular.
Having completed my masters in International Relations, my research thesis based on Predicting Conflict through AI while my broader interests lie within the frontiers of International Relations, Regional Development, Geopolitics, Economy, History enabling the Strategic Integration of Social Sciences in terms of Policy Thinking and Field Based Practices across the Global South.

I am a political scientist by training and an interdisciplinary scholar at the core.
Interdisciplinary trajectories allow me to see the deficiencies of hyper disciplinary commitments and complementary possibilities when identity politics (the idea that who are matters as a foundation of institutions) meets conventional political/institutional analyses (the idea that institutions/ organizations matter before or beyond identity). My conversation partners range from Anthropologists to sociologist, to theologians and policy analysts, to reference a few. See my interests keywords and let’s get in touch at the intersection of our encounter.

I am a political communication scholar with a particular focus on gender. My research interests include gendered mediation, political communication, online campaigning, political marketing, political journalism, African media and journalism and visual communication. Methodically, my expertise is in qualitative research including (multimodal) critical discourse analysis, (elite) interviewing, textual analysis and focus groups. My recent research examined representations of Ghanaian and Nigerian women politicians in print and radio news, as well as their self-representation on social media.

Rachel Spronk is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Amsterdam. She works at the intersection of three scholarly fields – anthropology, gender and sexuality studies, and African studies. She is studying the development of the (idea of the) middle classes in Kenya and Ghana and how those social transformations relate to changes in gender, sexuality and self-perceptions. In her work she combines the ethnographic study of practices and self-perceptions with the task of rethinking our theoretical repertoires. Overall, she investigates the interface between sexuality and the middle class in Ghana and Kenya, examining problematic assumptions behind both terms. This provides a productive ground for theorising sexuality and the middle class from the South: she aims to re-locate discussions on modernity using the terms ‘South’ and ‘North’ to denote a set of relations rather than geographical locations by incorporating the North as one of many sites and cultures in a world of plurality. In other words, rather than using realities from the South as raw data they are of global heuristic for theorizing.

Cinema audiences and reception

This project seeks to develop literature on the voices of cinema-going audiences in Nigeria, Ghana (two vibrant Anglophone filmmaking countries on the continent) and other African countries. Very little information exists on the history of spectatorship, audiences’ socio-economic status, viewing preferences and interpretive strategies of African film audiences. Through ethnographic and survey approaches, existing knowledge gaps will be closed with rich and layered descriptions of film spectatorship and audiences. The publications produced from the research will be useful to scholars, filmmakers, cinema operators and investors, who require more than market research surveys for creative intervention. The objectives of the study are to produce an updated history of spectatorship in Nigeria and Ghana, with an overview of contemporary spaces and media of African cinema audiences (including Internet, cinemas, Africa Magic channels etc); to examine and document the socio-economic status, audience preferences and interpretive strategies of African cinema-going audiences in an attempt to close existing knowledge gaps in film scholarship; to complement the audience work which I began in Lagos in July 2016, given that the Nigerian and Ghanaian film industries arguably share commonalities in terms of their postcolonial status, cultural production models and values. The reception of particular filmmakers is welcome.

African film and social change

The impact of films, particularly documentary films, is already being tracked and documented in South Africa. Arguably, the same can hardly be said of scholars working in the eastern and western parts of the continent. In India – where a thriving film industry also exists – social change is attributed to Partition films, for example. And in the United States, the plethora of films that depict politics and history generate huge debates on representational strategies and social change. Several of such films are used as instructional aids in formal learning environments; and the way they shape our knowledge of the world is well-documented. This project examines the social function of films – documentaries and feature-length productions. Where films are used to promote development, peace, reconciliation or conflict resolution, it is of interest to examine how that was achieved. To deal with the objective of measuring the impact of socio-political films, such films have to be strategically exposed to key stakeholders. These include those who are able to effect the desired change i.e. policy makers and researchers, relevant government agencies, social and political activists and non-governmental organisations to mention a few. Therefore, the methods of this project will include historical and contemporary perspectives of film screenings and their effects, focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews of key individuals. This will also broaden the scope of study thus yielding richer analyses of film and social change.

Celebrity studies

This study seeks to examine the motivations of celebrity crossover from entertainment to political office. It is quite common to listen to media celebrities discussing their intentions to create social impact by giving back to the society that contributed to their rise to stardom. Some celebrities believe that this contribution can be achieved by occupying a political office. However, scholars and celebrity fans have expressed reservations about celebrities’ crossover into politics because of a presumed lack of expertise in political affairs. With the huge fan base that some Nigerian celebrities have within and outside the African continent, it is quite easy to promote social causes and create impact through their social media pages without necessarily venturing into politics. And so, being conscious of their positions yet seeking political offices implies that some motivations are unclear to the public. It is therefore necessary to probe the motivations of these celebrities crossing over to hold political offices. Also worthy of scholarly attention are the pains and gains of the crossover as well as the decisions to remain politicians after a term has been served, to return to their previous art or to straddle both worlds. This project will benefit from all the methods applicable to case studies.

I am an art historian. I specialise in gender studies and transgressive Christian iconography in post-apartheid South African art. Much of the art work that I research and write about falls into the category of activism or social commentary within a post-colonial framework.

Senior Lecturer and Head of the Department of African Literature, University of the Witwatersrand South Africa Academic Discipline: Anthropology, Cultural Studies, Drama, Theatre, Music, Geography, History, Political Science, Sociology Interests Keywords: gender and sexualities; affect; intimacy; ritual practices/ performances; performance studies; consumption; narrative; pedagogy, women About me: Sustainable Development Goals: Clean Water and Sanitation, Decent [...]

I am a Sociologist-turned Anthropologist (additional training) with interests in Gender and Sex Studies. I focus on representations of men and boys, sexual cultures (intimacies, desires, eroticism, pleasures), sexual health, and queer sexuality. I have secondary interests in families and relationships studies. Last few years, I have been preoccupied with trying to understand masculinity and sex in West Africa. My current research, for example, makes links with how men talk about local aphrodisiacs use (e.g., herbal bitters) and notions of manhood, including issues related to men’s insecurities and vulnerabilities about hegemonic masculine ideals and women’s power in sexual relationships. I am an editorial member and reviewer of some renowned journals in the humanities/social sciences including Men and Masculinities (Sage); Reproductive Health Matters (Taylor & Francis); Culture, Health and Sexuality (Rutledge); PLOS ONE, Journal of Homosexuality (Taylor and Francis), Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare (Elsevier), and others. In addition, I examine for leading universities in Africa such as the University of Cape Town in South Africa. I am also engaged in advocacy about non-binary and gender-variant lives in Ghana. I have won grants/fellowship from notable institutions namely: International African Institute, UK; American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS), USA; Population Association of America, USA; the French Institute for Demographic Studies (INED), France; African Studies Association (ASA), USA; Association for the Study of Sexuality, Culture and Society (IASSCS); Trojan® Brand; CODESRIA; and Ghana Studies Association, USA. I am an AHP Fellow and a double recipient of the World Social Science Forum Fellowship Award supported by the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC). A Senior Lecturer in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Cape Coast, I founded the Centre for Men’s Health and Sex Studies; a not-for-profit organization to promote and gain support for work on men in Ghana.