Quality Education

Interested Scholars

The following scholars are interested in this topic:

Restructuring History is the most futuristic approach towards Development” is the outlook and motivation with which I explore the arena of Area Studies to arrive at Alternative Development strategies by deriving Alternatives to Development in its current form and practice.
A passionate reader engulfed in designing holistic Geopolitical and Economic policies in integration to the Historical adaptations and approaches to the development of South Asia emphasising on the social, economic, political dimensions I see myself taking up a
leadership role at the United Nations and other intragovernmental agencies as a formidable voice from the developing nations, Modern South Asia in particular.
Having completed my masters in International Relations, my research thesis based on Predicting Conflict through AI while my broader interests lie within the frontiers of International Relations, Regional Development, Geopolitics, Economy, History enabling the Strategic Integration of Social Sciences in terms of Policy Thinking and Field Based Practices across the Global South.

I am an academic, researcher and broadcaster. My research is on climate change and national security. I am also interested about social resilience, democracy, development economy, good governance

Cinema audiences and reception

This project seeks to develop literature on the voices of cinema-going audiences in Nigeria, Ghana (two vibrant Anglophone filmmaking countries on the continent) and other African countries. Very little information exists on the history of spectatorship, audiences’ socio-economic status, viewing preferences and interpretive strategies of African film audiences. Through ethnographic and survey approaches, existing knowledge gaps will be closed with rich and layered descriptions of film spectatorship and audiences. The publications produced from the research will be useful to scholars, filmmakers, cinema operators and investors, who require more than market research surveys for creative intervention. The objectives of the study are to produce an updated history of spectatorship in Nigeria and Ghana, with an overview of contemporary spaces and media of African cinema audiences (including Internet, cinemas, Africa Magic channels etc); to examine and document the socio-economic status, audience preferences and interpretive strategies of African cinema-going audiences in an attempt to close existing knowledge gaps in film scholarship; to complement the audience work which I began in Lagos in July 2016, given that the Nigerian and Ghanaian film industries arguably share commonalities in terms of their postcolonial status, cultural production models and values. The reception of particular filmmakers is welcome.

African film and social change

The impact of films, particularly documentary films, is already being tracked and documented in South Africa. Arguably, the same can hardly be said of scholars working in the eastern and western parts of the continent. In India – where a thriving film industry also exists – social change is attributed to Partition films, for example. And in the United States, the plethora of films that depict politics and history generate huge debates on representational strategies and social change. Several of such films are used as instructional aids in formal learning environments; and the way they shape our knowledge of the world is well-documented. This project examines the social function of films – documentaries and feature-length productions. Where films are used to promote development, peace, reconciliation or conflict resolution, it is of interest to examine how that was achieved. To deal with the objective of measuring the impact of socio-political films, such films have to be strategically exposed to key stakeholders. These include those who are able to effect the desired change i.e. policy makers and researchers, relevant government agencies, social and political activists and non-governmental organisations to mention a few. Therefore, the methods of this project will include historical and contemporary perspectives of film screenings and their effects, focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews of key individuals. This will also broaden the scope of study thus yielding richer analyses of film and social change.

Celebrity studies

This study seeks to examine the motivations of celebrity crossover from entertainment to political office. It is quite common to listen to media celebrities discussing their intentions to create social impact by giving back to the society that contributed to their rise to stardom. Some celebrities believe that this contribution can be achieved by occupying a political office. However, scholars and celebrity fans have expressed reservations about celebrities’ crossover into politics because of a presumed lack of expertise in political affairs. With the huge fan base that some Nigerian celebrities have within and outside the African continent, it is quite easy to promote social causes and create impact through their social media pages without necessarily venturing into politics. And so, being conscious of their positions yet seeking political offices implies that some motivations are unclear to the public. It is therefore necessary to probe the motivations of these celebrities crossing over to hold political offices. Also worthy of scholarly attention are the pains and gains of the crossover as well as the decisions to remain politicians after a term has been served, to return to their previous art or to straddle both worlds. This project will benefit from all the methods applicable to case studies.

I work primarily in relation to theatre, but also use other art forms; film, drawing, poetry, photography and literature. I teach, research, direct, train and run a range of projects in realtion to arts in Africa. Most of my work has taken place in East and the Horn of Africa and I have lived and worked in Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Sudan, Zimbabwe and The Gambia as well as visiting many other African nations. My current range of projects are all in Kenya and Uganda and focus around using the arts to promote gender equity and creativity with particular interestssexual health education and maternal mortality. I regularly work in an interdisciplinary mode using arts to research and to ‘speak to power’.

Senior Lecturer and Head of the Department of African Literature, University of the Witwatersrand South Africa Academic Discipline: Anthropology, Cultural Studies, Drama, Theatre, Music, Geography, History, Political Science, Sociology Interests Keywords: gender and sexualities; affect; intimacy; ritual practices/ performances; performance studies; consumption; narrative; pedagogy, women About me: Sustainable Development Goals: Clean Water and Sanitation, Decent [...]

I research comparative regionalism with a special focus on African regions and the EU. I interrogate the ‘Actorships’ of State, non-state and external actors in regionalism/ regional integration in Africa.

My research I work on the Timbuktu manuscripts, more specifically Islamic legal opinions, a genre of Islamic law (legal literature) as a historical source for the everyday lives and practices of Timbuktu’s wives and Muslim jurist consults during the colonial era (1907 – 1950). I also work on Timbuktu’s seventeenth, nineteenth and twentieth-century chronicles. However, I am also interested in decoloniality. The Timbuktu manuscripts as one of many precolonial written intellectual traditions in Africa constitute an archive toward decoloniality. (With Africa I mean the whole continent, not just so-called Sub-Saharan Africa as apart from so-called North Africa; this divide is a construct of a past colonialism and and existing coloniality). Teaching the Study of Religion I am interested in foundational religious texts and religious-intellectual traditions.

I am a global historian focused on West Africa, slavery and its abolition and the history of children and childhoods. Here at the University of Glasgow I work closely with Stephen Mullen, Jelmer Vos and Simon Newman as part of the Slavery Studies Network and I am part of the Centre for Gender History. My work focuses on the importance of children and ideas about childhood to labour regimes, particularly those systems designed to bring an end to slavery.

I am currently doing research into child labour and childcare in Sierra Leone and Liberia. This project, funded by the Leverhulme Trust, examines the relationships between the family home, civilising missions, and Black Diaspora colonisation of West Africa in the 19th century. The publications which have emerged from this project deal with topics as diverse as forced labour, developmental politics and breastfeeding.

I’m also co-leading a project titled Seeking Refuge which is a collaboration between artists, writers, academics and tech professionals to experiment with new ways of presenting information online about people’s experiences of trying to escape enslavement.

Before coming to Glasgow I was a post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Kent from 2015 to 2017 and at the Bayreuth Academy of Advanced African Studies from 2013 to 2015. In these positions I worked closely with the Iwalewahaus art gallery in Bayreuth to explore creative practice based research and with the Centre for the History of Colonialisms to advance the study of imperial and colonial history. I studied for my PhD at the Chair for the History of the Modern World at ETHZ, supervised by Harald Fischer-Tiné and Andreas Eckert. I also have an MSc in History from the London School of Economics where I worked closely with Joanna Lewis.

Before my PhD studies I worked in the charity sector for a Scottish organisation which supported lone parents into education and training. I also spent two years working for the Scottish government as an online learning developer. I maintain an interest in the use of digital and online technologies to overcome social and economic barriers to education.

Currently Associate Professor at the Department of Political Science and International Relations, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa Ethiopia. I have teaching courses in International Relations Theories, Politics of Africa, International Human Rights, International Law and Organizations, Democracy and Development, Contemporary Global Politics and Transnationalism. My current research interests in the main, migration, human rights, conflict resolution, transnational involvement in the Horn of Africa, political communities in Africa.

Post Doctoral Researcher United Kingdom Academic Discipline: Economics, Public Policy, Sociology Interests Keywords: migration, NGOs, Poverty, Third sector About me: Sustainable Development Goals: No Poverty, Quality Education, Reduced Inequalities, Responsible Consumption and Production I am interested in the following geographical area(s): Asia and Oceania Southeast Asia Components of the GCRF I am interested in: I [...]

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