Justice and Strong Institutions

Interested Scholars

The following scholars are interested in this topic:

I am a Lord Kelvin Adam Smith Research Fellow and Lecturer (assistant professor) in History at the University of Glasgow in Scotland, UK. I use oral historical and ethnographic methods to study transitional communities, particularly post-genocide Rwanda, Uganda and Bosnia-Herzegovina. My research interests include mass atrocities, nationalized commemoration, symbolic violence, transitional justice, mass grave exhumations, and the ethical and methodological challenges surrounding qualitative fieldwork amid highly politicized research settings.

I am a political communication scholar with a particular focus on gender. My research interests include gendered mediation, political communication, online campaigning, political marketing, political journalism, African media and journalism and visual communication. Methodically, my expertise is in qualitative research including (multimodal) critical discourse analysis, (elite) interviewing, textual analysis and focus groups. My recent research examined representations of Ghanaian and Nigerian women politicians in print and radio news, as well as their self-representation on social media.

I work primarily in relation to theatre, but also use other art forms; film, drawing, poetry, photography and literature. I teach, research, direct, train and run a range of projects in realtion to arts in Africa. Most of my work has taken place in East and the Horn of Africa and I have lived and worked in Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Sudan, Zimbabwe and The Gambia as well as visiting many other African nations. My current range of projects are all in Kenya and Uganda and focus around using the arts to promote gender equity and creativity with particular interestssexual health education and maternal mortality. I regularly work in an interdisciplinary mode using arts to research and to ‘speak to power’.

I am a Lecturer in Politics & International Relations at Loughborough University. My main research interests lie in the field of peace and conflict studies and in the politics of developing countries (particularly Africa and Latino America). My main research interests lie in the field of peace and conflict studies: in particular, I am interested in understanding the transition from war to peace and the long-term legacies of violent conflicts. My recent publications look at the problem of building a legitimate political order and a functioning state after a civil war terminated in the victory of one of the warring parties. I am currently involved in two main research projects. In collaboration with Phil Martin (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and Jeremy Speight (University of Alaska at Fairbanks) I am exploring the legacies of rebel governance in Northern of Côte d’Ivoire. I am also co-investigator in the ESRC-Colciencia funded project “Territorial planning for peace and statebuilding in the Alto Cauca region of Colombia” (2018-2020), directed by Katherine Gough (Loughborough University, Geography) and Irene Velez Torres (Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia). I have applied a wide range of research methods in my research, such as structured and open-ended interviews, focus groups and quantitative surveys.

I research comparative regionalism with a special focus on African regions and the EU. I interrogate the ‘Actorships’ of State, non-state and external actors in regionalism/ regional integration in Africa.

I am a global historian focused on West Africa, slavery and its abolition and the history of children and childhoods. Here at the University of Glasgow I work closely with Stephen Mullen, Jelmer Vos and Simon Newman as part of the Slavery Studies Network and I am part of the Centre for Gender History. My work focuses on the importance of children and ideas about childhood to labour regimes, particularly those systems designed to bring an end to slavery.

I am currently doing research into child labour and childcare in Sierra Leone and Liberia. This project, funded by the Leverhulme Trust, examines the relationships between the family home, civilising missions, and Black Diaspora colonisation of West Africa in the 19th century. The publications which have emerged from this project deal with topics as diverse as forced labour, developmental politics and breastfeeding.

I’m also co-leading a project titled Seeking Refuge which is a collaboration between artists, writers, academics and tech professionals to experiment with new ways of presenting information online about people’s experiences of trying to escape enslavement.

Before coming to Glasgow I was a post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Kent from 2015 to 2017 and at the Bayreuth Academy of Advanced African Studies from 2013 to 2015. In these positions I worked closely with the Iwalewahaus art gallery in Bayreuth to explore creative practice based research and with the Centre for the History of Colonialisms to advance the study of imperial and colonial history. I studied for my PhD at the Chair for the History of the Modern World at ETHZ, supervised by Harald Fischer-Tiné and Andreas Eckert. I also have an MSc in History from the London School of Economics where I worked closely with Joanna Lewis.

Before my PhD studies I worked in the charity sector for a Scottish organisation which supported lone parents into education and training. I also spent two years working for the Scottish government as an online learning developer. I maintain an interest in the use of digital and online technologies to overcome social and economic barriers to education.

Currently Associate Professor at the Department of Political Science and International Relations, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa Ethiopia. I have teaching courses in International Relations Theories, Politics of Africa, International Human Rights, International Law and Organizations, Democracy and Development, Contemporary Global Politics and Transnationalism. My current research interests in the main, migration, human rights, conflict resolution, transnational involvement in the Horn of Africa, political communities in Africa.

A Poland and Germany trained legal academician, since five years in East Africa. Interested in comparative research on all areas of constitutional law and law of regional integration. And in Public International Law.

I have recently completed my PhD in Sociology at the University of Essex. My work is part of a growing area of academic scholarship, which challenges the dominant ‘human trafficking’ narratives/discourses. My doctoral research is aimed at exploring the responses to child trafficking in South Asia particularly in Nepal. This research looks at the issues of child trafficking in Nepal by taking a critical stance on the concept of trafficking, by looking at the ways national and international legislations formulate this concepts and how in turn this is made sense of in practice by various law enforces and implementation agencies, including international non-government organisations (INGOs) and non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

I have several years of professional work experience in the field of sexual reproductive health, gender, and human rights issues working with various I/NGOs in Nepal.
I currently teach Policy, Punishment and Society at the University of Essex and I am also a visiting lecturer in Criminology at the University of Roehampton.

PhD Candidate United States Academic Discipline: Political Science Interests Keywords: authoritarian regimes; political institutions; political behavior; gender politics; foreign aid About me: Sustainable Development Goals: Gender Equality, Justice and Strong Institutions, No Poverty, Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions, Reduced Inequalities I am interested in the following geographical area(s): Sub-Saharan Africa Components of the GCRF I [...]

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