Western Hemisphere

Interested Scholars

The following scholars are interested in this topic:

Dr. Daniel Rio Tinto holds a Ph.D. in Political Science and International Studies at the University of Birmingham (UK), where he worked with the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security (ICCS). His doctoral thesis is entitled ‘Tracing the Security Dilemma in Civil Wars: how fear and insecurity can lead to intra-state violence?’ and evaluates the performance of the Security Dilemma as an explanation for the outbreak of violence in civil wars, drawing from the cases of post-decolonization violence in Angola and Mozambique. Daniel also holds a Master in Political Science and International Relations at the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Lisbon’s New University (NOVA-FCSH) and a BA in International Relations from Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio). Daniel’s broad research interests include International Relations Theory, International Security, Conflict Studies, Defence Studies, Political Violence, Civil Wars & Intra-State Conflicts, Nuclear Politics, The Changing Character of War, Insurgencies & Asymmetric Warfare, Peace Operations, Civil Defence & Safety, Strategy on Conventional (Air, Land & Sea) & Non-Conventional (NBC, Remote, Cyber, Space) Environments, Case-study Methodology and Process Tracing Techniques. His regional expertise covers sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America.

Currently, Dr. Rio Tinto is a Nuclear Security Fellow (Stanton Foundation) with the School of International Relations, Fundação Getúlio Vargas, São Paulo (FGV-SP), where he is working on a project on the impact of armed violence and criminal activities on the nuclear security challenges and policies, particularly looking at Brazil’s context, and part of a wider project on the relationship between nuclear politics and internal conflict. Previously, Daniel has contributed to the Brazilian Naval War College (EGN), the Brazilian Peace Operations Joint Training Center (CCOPAB), the Portuguese Institute of International Relations (IPRI), the Portuguese Institute for National Defence (IDN) and Oxford Analytica.

My research interests include conflict and cooperation, democratization, and research methods, including data development and data analysis. For more information, see my personal webpage http://ksgleditsch.com

Lecturer (Assistant Professor) United Kingdom Academic Discipline: Political Science Interests Keywords: political economy; global governance and organizations; environmental policy; international crises About me: Sustainable Development Goals: Affordable and Clean Energy, Climate Action I am interested in the following geographical area(s): Europe, Western Hemisphere Components of the GCRF I am interested in: Projects on comparative politics [...]

Dr. Leah Windsor is a Research Assistant Professor in the Institute for Intelligent Systems at The University of Memphis. She received her Bachelor of Science in Linguistics from Georgetown University in 1998, her Master’s degree in Political Science at The University of Memphis in 2005, and her Ph.D. in Political Science from The University of Mississippi in 2012. Dr. Windsor currently serves as PI for a Minerva Initiative grant administered by the U.S. Department of Defense that examines political communication in authoritarian regimes and opaque political groups. Her work uses computational linguistics and discourse analysis to answer questions about regime survival, political crisis and conflict, propaganda and persuasion, bluffs and threats, governance, and radicalization. Her interdisciplinary approach to understanding political language is situated at the intersection of political science, psychology, cognitive science, computer science, neurobiology, methodology, and linguistics. Dr. Windsor was selected as Smart City Fellow with the City of Memphis and the FedEx Institute of Technology where she analyzes issues in local Memphis politics. She is also interested in issues of bias and ethnocentrism in studying political language, including corpus selection, translation, and document preparation. In February 2017, Dr. Windsor’s lab was selected for a Team Initiation Grant by the University of Memphis’ Division of Research and Sponsored Programs to study how multimodal forms of communication including language, nonverbal cues, and audiovisual elements, can inform our understanding of methods of persuasion, elements of cognition, keys to decoding deception, and locus of attention. Dr. Windsor is also co-authoring a book on family formation in academia that presents research from an international survey about academic parents. Most recently she was invited to present her work to the National Academy of Sciences and the Department of Defense. Her work has been published in Terrorism and Political Violence, International Interactions, The International Feminist Journal of Politics, and Political Research Quarterly.

Research Fellow Germany Academic Discipline: Public Policy Interests Keywords: Global South, Health Systems, Health Systems Typologies., Social Policy About me: Sustainable Development Goals: Good Health and Well-being, Reduced Inequalities I am interested in the following geographical area(s): Western Hemisphere Andean States, Brazil, Caribbean, Central America, Guianas, Mexico, Southern Cone Components of the GCRF I am [...]

Associate Professor United States Academic Discipline: Political Science, Public Policy Interests Keywords: human rights, military aid, military intervention, post-conflict countries About me: Sustainable Development Goals: Justice and Strong Institutions, Peace, Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions I am interested in the following geographical area(s): Western Hemisphere Andean States, Central America, Mexico, Southern Cone Components of the [...]

I study the emergence of social movements and campaigns that seek to address socio-political inequalities. I have recently completed my PhD in Government [Political Science] at the University of Essex. My dissertation research focuses on nonviolent resistance, when violent and non-violent conflicts are more likely, as well as state responses to protest events. I utilise both, cross-national samples as well as case studies data in my research. I am currently working as a Research Assistant for the Catalyst Project, University of Essex, Department of Government.

I study how social identity affects electoral accountability, the functioning of government, and political behaviour. My work lies at the intersection of Political Economy, Political Behaviour, Experimental Methods, and Political Psychology. In my research I build on strategic and behavioural theories of principal-agent relationships and voting. I implement experiments to analyse how individuals evaluate their politicians’ performance, when they discriminate in favour of their social group, how they make redistributive allocation decisions, or how they coordinate their choices with their peers.

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